Celebrating National Women’s Health Week 2024

This year National Women’s Health Week takes place from May 12th to the 18th. This particular week we highlight women’s health issues and priorities. We encourage women to engage in healthy practices, and preventive care. This year’s theme is “Empowering Women, Cultivating Health: Celebrating Voices, Health, and Resilience.” Why? Because women need to feel empowered to make their physical and well-being a priority. This includes making sure you get all the screenings needed: preventive cancer screenings along with vision, and dental checkups. (P.S. Did you know our Founder and Chief Visionary, Tamika Felder serves as a Women’s Health Week Ambassador?)

As a certified Health, Fitness and Wellness Coach, I was present at a wellness conference where I first heard Dr. Rudolph E. Tanzi, a professor of Neurology at Harvard University, Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit, Co-Director of the Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health at Massachusetts General Hospital, and a bestselling author.

Dr. Tanzi created the “S.H.I.E.L.D. Plan”. This plan help us remember how to take care of our physical and mental health with the everyday steps you can take to preserve and promote your well-being. This plan really resonated with me, and I incorporated these steps into my daily life. I also teach it to my clients, to my students, and I hope it will help you too.

S.H.I.E.L.D. is an acronym that stands for the following: (not necessarily in this order)

SSleep. You must try to sleep at least 7-8 hours at night. It is during this time that the body repairs, allowing healing and restoration to occur. Lack of sleep is associated with negative health effects. So in other words…get your snooze on.

HHandle Your Stress. Yes! This is easier said than done, but we must try. Give yourself a break if you feel stressed out. Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Stress is a known component to chronic diseases like diabetes, ulcers, and heart disease.

IInteract With Others. Social connection with others can improve the ability to recover from stress, anxiety, and depression. In summary, human interaction is an essential part of life, and it has physical and mental benefits. A recent study found that people who experienced social isolation had a 32% higher risk of dying early.

EExercise. Ahhh! That’s something I know about. To be honest, throughout the years of being a fitness professional, I have learned not to even call it “exercise” but just plain and simple “moving the body”. Most people when they hear the word “exercise” think about punishment to the body – it is far from the truth. Finding a movement that works for you is key. Starting small and working up to the recommended 150 minutes a week will give you so many benefits for your mind, your body, and your spirit.

LLearn New Things. Dr. Tanzi states, “Practicing a new and challenging activity is a good bet for building and maintaining cognitive skills.” We can do this at any age. Learning new information can be as simple as trying a new recipe, reading or listening to a book, or taking a class online.

DDiet. For most people, “diet” conjures up thoughts of deprivation and restriction. We feel that it is something that we must do or that we must punish ourselves for the crime of overeating. No matter what you think about diets, we ALL have one. A diet is simply a pattern of eating. Whatever health means to you, the right diet will support it. There is no one-size-fits-all model for dietary patterns and health.

Side Note: I would incorporate hydration here too. Drinking water is crucial for our bodies. The majority of adults do not hydrate themselves close to the recommended level. In fact, multiple studies report that 75% of adults in the U.S. suffer from chronic dehydration. As we age, your body’s thirst signal diminishes, so as a rule of thumb when you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated. Please drink your water.

So there you have it – that is the “S.H.I.E.L.D Plan” – the daily steps that Dr. Tanzi believes will promote health and longevity! Ideally, you will incorporate these steps in your daily life, and they will become healthy habits.

If these six steps are too overwhelming all at once, which is understandable, take it slow and work one-step at a time. For example, focus on your sleep if you are not getting the recommended hours. After you improve that, then work on the next step, and so on. It is never too late to incorporate these steps. Never too late to start anything. Believe me whatever you do consistently, it will make a difference on your well-being. Do not give up!

Patti Murillo-Casa is a Cervivor Ambassador and Cervivor’s Health and Wellness Coach who manages Survivor Slimdown Facebook Group (Open to any cancer survivor). She also co-leads Cervivor Español. Patti is a retired NYPD police officer and a 15-year cervical cancer survivor. She resides in NYC with her husband of 25 years where she is a Groups Fitness Instructor, Cancer Exercise Specialist and a Health Advocate and Educator.

A May To Remember

As May unfolds its vibrant colors and warmer days, it brings with it a variety of celebrations, honoring rich cultures and invaluable professions. It’s a month of recognition, reflection, and appreciation. In this blog post, we recognize the significance of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, culminating in the heartfelt acknowledgment of National Nurses Week and National Oncology Nurses Month.

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month
May marks a special time to celebrate the diverse cultures, traditions, and contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in the United States. It’s a time to honor the resilience, achievements, and rich heritage of these communities that have shaped the very fabric of American society. 

From the vibrant festivals and cuisines to the profound contributions in arts, science, technology, and beyond, the AAPI community has left a mark on every aspect of American life. It’s a moment to reflect on their journeys, triumphs, and ongoing struggles, cultivating understanding, respect, and unity.

Sharing cervical cancer stories among Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) is vital for creating an open dialogue that transcends generations. By sharing their experiences, AAPI individuals not only break the silence surrounding cervical cancer within their communities but also dismantle cultural taboos and stigmas associated with discussing health issues openly. 

Through storytelling, they can address unique challenges, such as language barriers, cultural beliefs, and access to healthcare, which may affect prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. By amplifying their voices, AAPI individuals empower others to prioritize their health, seek preventive care, and engage in informed discussions with healthcare providers. This open dialogue not only raises awareness but also paves the way for improved support networks, advocacy efforts, and healthcare policies tailored to the needs of AAPI communities, ultimately contributing to better health outcomes for future generations. 

National Nurses Week
Amidst the celebration of cultural diversity, May also holds a special place to honor those who epitomize compassion, care, and resilience – nurses. National Nurses Week, celebrated annually from May 6th to May 12th, pays tribute to the remarkable contributions of nurses to the healthcare sector and society at large.

Nurses are the heart and soul of healthcare, providing comfort, healing, and support to patients and families during their most vulnerable moments. Their dedication, sacrifice, and commitment often go unrecognized, yet their impact reverberates profoundly in the lives they touch. If you would like to honor your nurse this month, send us an email at [email protected] with a photo and/or a written shoutout.

National Oncology Nurses Month
In the same vein, May also shines a spotlight on a group of healthcare professionals who provide exceptional care to individuals enduring cancer. National Oncology Nurses Month recognizes the invaluable role of oncology nurses in delivering comprehensive, compassionate, and personalized care to cancer patients.

These dedicated professionals navigate the complex terrain of cancer treatment with grace, empathy, and expertise, offering not just medical support but also emotional and psychological solace to patients and their loved ones. Their tireless efforts and boundless compassion make a tangible difference in the lives of those affected by cancer.

As we traverse through May, let us embrace the spirit of celebration, gratitude, and solidarity. Let us honor the rich tapestry of Asian American and Pacific Islander heritage, celebrating diversity and cultivating a community rooted in inclusivity. Simultaneously, let us extend our deepest appreciation to the nurses – the unsung heroes of healthcare, whose selflessness and dedication inspire us all. Whether it’s through cultural appreciation or healthcare acknowledgment, May offers us all the opportunity to reflect on how diversity and dedication enrich our lives and communities.