“Hey Girl” Video Highlights the Importance of Support

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month (CCAM) is very much about advocacy, education and outreach. It’s about making our voices heard and about not allowing cervical cancer – and the toll that it takes – to be invisible or stigmatized. This is very much is the mission of Cervivor. Yet, there is also a quieter yet equally as important mission: to be here for each other, to be a support, a shoulder to cry on, an experience-sharer, and a place to go for connection with someone who has been in the same place, fighting the same disease. 

Emily and Cervivor Founder, Tamika Felder

Cervivor’s video “Hey Girl” highlights the lifeline that the Cervivor community has been for so many. 

“To the girl who’s just been diagnosed with cervical cancer, I want to say, ‘Hey girl – I’ve been there too.’ I understand what you’re going through. Your mind is spinning, you’re confused. I just want you to know that you are not alone,” says pink-haired Iowa-based Cervivor Ambassador Emily Hoffman to the camera, kicking off the video.

Emily shares some of her experiences with Cervivor support and connection below:

Q: How did you plug into the support network of Cervivor? What does it mean to you?

It’s funny that I’m in a video that will be shared across social media, as I am not active on social media at all. I don’t use Facebook or Instagram or Twitter. I also wasn’t active on it back when I was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2013 at age 30. I’d gone through diagnosis and treatment alone, without a supportive community to connect with, share with or learn from. I didn’t know that I needed it. I didn’t realize how alone the disease had made me, and how alone I had made myself. 

I first found the Cervivor website in early 2014 a few months after my treatment ended, and I spent the next 24 hours on it! At the time, I was experiencing so many side effects from my radiation. On Cervivor.org, I finally found ‘my ladies, my community.'” I read every story, every page of the site. I clicked on the link to CervivorTV on YouTube and I watched every episode. I literally stayed up all night.  That was the first time I’d found other young adults with cervical cancer. The website became my lifeline! The website became my connection to other young women who had been where I’d been and had gone through – and were going through – the same thing I was. I no longer felt alone.

Through Cervivor events and events like CancerCon, I met others in the Cervivor community. The people whose stories I’d benefited from online became real to me. They put me in touch with other cervical cancer survivors. Suddenly, I had women just like me to talk to, to call, email, and text. 

Cervivor School 2019, Chicago

Today, six years later, I am a Cervivor School graduate and a Cervivor Ambassador. I’m still not on social media, but I’m connected in so many other ways. If I have a worry or frustration or scare – I have people – via email, text, phone and in person – to reach out to who ‘get it.’

Q: How did you come to be the face of the “Hey Girl” video?

One of the activities I participated in at the 2019 Cervivor School was to write a letter to a woman who was newly diagnosed with cervical cancer. I guess my letter moved people, because the next thing I knew, I was asked to record and film it! 

Because we were writing to an anonymous woman, I struggled with how to start the letter…so I sort of naturally landed on “Hey girl” as a greeting, because it felt informal, friendly and inviting. Little did I know that “Hey girl” is actually a popular internet meme – which people told me later – that features Hollywood heartthrob Ryan Gosling saying all sorts of romantic stuff. Maybe that’s why my letter got such a good response, without me even trying.

While people have shown me the Ryan Gosling memes (they really are quite funny!), my own “Hey girl” message is no joke. It’s true, personal and heartfelt. Women need to know that they are not alone. Women undergoing diagnosis and treatment – and the after effects of treatment – need to know that there is a whole community of women – a whole organization of Cervivors – here to support them.

Q: Six years after your cancer diagnosis, how do you plug into the Cervivor network of support today?

I take great comfort in knowing my Cervivor community is here for me. I have the phone numbers of many of the women I’ve connected with, that I carry with me wherever I go, for whenever I may need them. For example, when I come out of an oncology follow-up appointment, I know who to text. In fact, recently my doctor said something not bad, but not particularly comforting – something I wasn’t exactly sure how to interpret despite my questions. It sent me spiraling. So I sent a text out and I got responses back in two minutes. That’s all I needed. They heard me, they got it. They put me at ease in a way no one else could at that moment. In this community, we can always be unfiltered and  never need to worry about judgement.

Now, being active in the Cervivor community gives me a sense of purpose as a cancer survivor. It enables me to use my experience to make a difference to other survivors. This video will make a difference!

About Emily

Emily is a 6+ year cervical cancer survivor and Cervivor Ambassador who is also involved with the Iowa Cancer Consortium and Iowa Department of Public Health on cervical cancer prevention initiatives. Read her Cervivor story.

CervivorTV Wins Three Telly Awards

Cervivor, Largest Network of Cervical Cancer Survivors Globally, Wins Three Global Telly Awards

Cervivor Chief Visionary Tamika Felder and Ambassador Carol Lacey Win Among 2,500 Entries

May 31, 2019 – Cervivor, the largest network of Cervical Cancer survivors in the world, announced the receipt of three Telly Awards. The Telly Awards honor excellence in video and television across all screens, and receive up to 12,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents. All videos were made in partnership with Tim Hashko, President of Steaming Kettle.

Carol’s Cervivor Story is the Gold Telly Winner in Social Video: Health & Wellness: “I’ve lost everything below my belt,” said Carol at the beginning of her video. But despite the removal of everything from her ovaries to her anus (being “sewn up like a Barbie doll” as she explains it), Carol’s video is more about the hope that she maintains after being given such a dark diagnosis. You can watch Carol’s Cervivor Story here

Additional Telly Awards given to Cervivor include:

  • Cervivor School won the Silver Telly Winner in Social Video – Not for Profit: A behind-the-scenes video of Cervivor’s trademark advocacy training event, Cervivor School, showed how a group of women came together in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, last year to learn how their own stories can help save lives. You can watch the Cervivor School video here.   
  • Cervivor Tamika Felder won the Bronze Telly Winner in Branded Content – Campaign – Promotional: “I cannot be the only person that has this type of cancer,” Tamika remembers questioning after her cervical cancer diagnosis. She discusses wanting to be the next Oprah Winfrey, living with a cancer linked to sexually transmitted infections, and how she built Cervivor to empower women to share their experiences with cervical cancer. You can see this and more in the award-winning video here

“Winning three Telly Awards for our work on Cervivor is a testament to the brave women in our network that advocate for themselves and others affected by the disease, who are forcing conversation about the ugly nature of this often misunderstood and stigmatized form of women’s cancer,” said Tamika Felder, Founder and Chief Visionary of Cervivor. “We feel heard – our stories are being validated and celebrated out of the 12,000 entries the Telly Awards receive, which shows that people want to learn about cervical cancer, they just need someone to teach them.”

Cervivor School is a networking, educational and motivational event that brings together and mobilizes cervical cancer patients and survivors to become more involved in the cervical cancer awareness and prevention movement. It supports women with training and tools to powerfully tell their stories to a range of audiences – including legislators and policy makers. Cervivor School 2019 will be in Chicago from September 26-28. You can find full details about this year’s event here

The Cervivor storytelling doesn’t stop after awards season: Tamika Felder is scheduled to speak at The Atlantic’s Cancer Stories on May 31, 2019, from 6:00-8:15pm CT in Chicago. The panelists at Cancer Stories will dive into the dark psychological effects of cancer, complexities of the disease past a fatal diagnosis, and the role media plays in sharing one’s cancer stories. You can find full details about the event here.  

About Tamika Felder

Tamika Felder is well-versed in media on both sides of the camera: she’s provided commentary to national radio shows, worked as a journalist and producer in multiple capacities, and is now in the process of making her own documentary. See this short video on her lifestyle website to see how she’s living her second chance, and read more about her experience with cervical cancer on the Cervivor website

About Cervivor

Cervivor builds a community for cervical cancer survivors, family members, educators and caregivers to advocate for HPV awareness, cervical cancer prevention, to create meaningful networks across survivors and experts in the field; and to ultimately change the future of women’s health. To learn more, visit www.cervivor.org

About The Telly Awards

The Telly Awards was founded in 1979 to honor excellence in local, regional and cable television commercials with non-broadcast video and television programming added soon after. With the recent evolution and rise of digital video (web series, VR, 360 and beyond), the Telly Awards today also reflects and celebrates this exciting new era of the moving image on and offline. The Telly Awards annually showcases the best work created within television and across video, for all screens. Receiving over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents, Telly Award winners represent work from some of the most respected advertising agencies, television stations, production companies and publishers from around the world. To learn more, visit www.tellyawards.com.