CervivorTV Wins Again!

Cervivor Chief Visionary Tamika Felder and music composer Pete Lacey Receive Three Telly Awards

May 25, 2021 – During a year when the world shutdown, Cervivor created a video that shows what resilience and strength look like. The song, The Will to BE, written and composed by Cervivor caregiver Pete Lacey, is the backdrop to this timeless music video featuring amazing cervical cancer survivors from around the world. This beautiful video was made in partnership with Tim Hashko, President of Steaming Kettle.

Winning Gold in Three Categories: Social Impact, Social Not for Profit and The People’s Choice

CervivorTV now holds six Telly Awards

“Winning three Telly Awards for our work on Cervivor is a testament to the brave women in our network that advocate for themselves and others affected by the disease, who are forcing conversation about the ugly nature of this often misunderstood and stigmatized form of women’s cancer,” said Tamika Felder, Founder and Chief Visionary of Cervivor. “We feel heard – our stories are being validated and celebrated out of the 12,000 entries the Telly Awards receive, which shows that people want to learn about cervical cancer, they just need someone to teach them.”

“When I saw the first cut of the video, I knew it was going to be something special. I soon recognized that my aspirational lyrics that are lived by incredibly inspirational Cervivors, would be impactful, thought provoking and healing. I’m humbled to know the world now thinks so too”, said Pete Lacey.

“We wanted to show the world that cervical cancer is not faceless. We come from all walks of life and have been affected by this horrible disease but we continue to persevere and find joy in living”, said Carol Lacey, Lead Cervivor Ambassador and Production Manager for the The Will to BE video.

Cervivor knows the power a story holds and this community did not hesitate to step up and bring a light of hope when so much of the world is struggling. We saw these women just as they are, sharing that in spite all the adversity cancer brings, life is about the small moments that bring us laughter, happiness and a sense of calm. As the rest of the world moves through a challenging pandemic, those in the Cervivor community showed us that it is possible to rise above stronger together.

About Tamika Felder

Tamika Felder is well-versed in media on both sides of the camera: she’s provided commentary to national radio shows, worked as a journalist and producer in multiple capacities, and is now in the process of making her own documentary. See this short video on her lifestyle website to see how she’s living her second chance, and read more about her experience with cervical cancer on the Cervivor website

About Cervivor

Cervivor builds a community for cervical cancer survivors, family members, educators and caregivers to advocate for HPV awareness, cervical cancer prevention, to create meaningful networks across survivors and experts in the field; and to ultimately change the future of women’s health. To learn more, visit www.cervivor.org

About Pete Lacey

Pete is an inspirational artist who has earned his reputation as a talented musician, skillful performer and composer. Pete generously donates much of the proceeds of the sale of his music to cancer fighting organizations like Cervivor. To learn more, visit www.petelacey.com.

About The Telly Awards

The Telly Awards was founded in 1979 to honor excellence in local, regional and cable television commercials with non-broadcast video and television programming added soon after. With the recent evolution and rise of digital video (web series, VR, 360 and beyond), the Telly Awards today also reflects and celebrates this exciting new era of the moving image on and offline. The Telly Awards annually showcases the best work created within television and across video, for all screens. Receiving over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents, Telly Award winners represent work from some of the most respected advertising agencies, television stations, production companies and publishers from around the world. To learn more, visit www.tellyawards.com.

“Your cervix looks different this year”

“Your cervix looks different this year,” said my primary care doctor several years ago, as she performed the pelvic exam part of my annual exam. I remember chuckling to myself, not fully grasping the severity of her comment yet. Instead, I laid on the table thinking, “How does she remember what my cervix looks like from year to year?”

My doctor referred me to a gynecologist when the exam was over. I didn’t understand, but I also didn’t ask any questions. I visited the gynecologist two days later. She performed a colposcopy and referred me to an oncologist. Two days after that, I met with the oncologist and he told me that I had stage 2B cervical cancer. What started out as a routine exam had quickly turned into a life-threatening diagnosis.

What if…? What if…? What if…?

How could I have cervical cancer? I didn’t feel sick. I had no symptoms. (Cervical cancer symptoms can include, but are not limited to, abnormal vaginal discharge, bleeding between periods, or pelvic pain during intercourse.) I went to my doctor every year for my annual well-woman exam and the results of my Pap tests always came back normal. But somehow, in the span of only one year, a 4 cm tumor had grown on my cervix. In one year, I went from having a normal Pap test result to having cancer. What a difference one year can make.

I started chemotherapy and radiation treatment to save my life. Doctors declared me cancer-free after I completed these treatments over the course of a few months. Today, I am a seven-year cervical cancer survivor. But my story could have been drastically different if I had skipped my well-woman exam that year.

What if I had used an excuse, like “I’m too busy”, to justify putting off that appointment? Or what if I had told myself that skipping one year wouldn’t hurt anything because I’m a generally healthy person? What if I had assumed my Pap test results would continue to be normal like they always had been? How much longer would my cancer have gone undetected? How far would my cancer have spread without my knowing? Would my prognosis have been different if my cancer wasn’t detected when it was? Would I even be alive today?

The importance of annual visits and cancer screenings

A cancer diagnosis is life changing. A cancer screening is lifesaving. Scheduling my annual exam saved my life. My cancer was detected early enough to be effectively treated because I went to my doctor every year.

If I had not scheduled my exam that year, my cancer would have continued to grow undetected and my life would have been at risk.

Preventative care exams are a breast exam, pelvic exam, and a Pap (and HPV) test. A Pap test looks for abnormal cells. If needed, these can be treated before they become cancerous. The HPV test looks for high-risk HPV that can cause abnormal cells. This lets your healthcare provider monitor you more closely for cell changes.. When the Pap test and HPV test are both performed during an exam, it is referred to as co-testing.

What are you waiting for?!

  • Reduce your risk for cervical cancer through screening tests, like the Pap test and HPV test.
  • Take care of yourself by scheduling your annual well-woman exam.
  • Raise awareness for cervical cancer detection and prevention by telling your family and friends to schedule their annual well-woman exams.
  • Benefit from Iowa’s Care for Yourself program, which provides free or low-cost cancer screenings for Iowans. Many other states have free or low-cost cancer screening programs too. Be sure to visit your state or county health department’s website.
  • Make a resolution to protect your health all year long.

About the Author

Emily Hoffman is a seven-year cervical cancer survivor who was diagnosed with stage 2B cervical cancer at age 30. She is a patient advocate and Cervivor Ambassador who shares her cancer story to raise awareness for cervical cancer and educate others on the importance of cancer screenings and prevention. Emily is the recipient of the 2020 Cervivor Spark Award. She is currently pursuing her certification to become a cancer registrar.