Welcome to the Clinical Trial Round Up!

It is an exciting time for science and cervical cancer! There have been limited treatments for cervical cancer for several years but now we are seeing more clinical trials opening especially for metastatic and recurrent cervical cancer patients. If you have information on a clinical trial that you would like us to include, please email us at info@cervivor.org.


innovaTV 301 – GOG 3057

The innovaTV 301 study is testing a study drug, tisotumab vedotin, for people with cervical cancer that has spread or has come back after treatment. During the study, participants will receive either the study drug or chemotherapy treatment for cervical cancer. This study drug works in a new way and is designed to target cervical cancer cells.

Visit their website here.


E7 TCR T Cells for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancers

Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical, throat, anal, and genital cancers. Cancers caused by HPV have a HPV protein called E7 inside of their cells. In this new therapy, researchers take a person’s blood, remove certain white blood cells, and insert genes that make them to target cancer cells that have the E7 protein. The genetically changed cells, called E7 TCR cells, are then given back to the person to fight the cancer.

Find out more here.


RTX-321

portrait of sportswoman standing in the the fields at sunrise

This Phase 1 clinical trial of RTX-321 for the treatment of HPV 16-associated cancers is an open label, multicenter, multidose, first-in-human dose escalation and expansion study designed to evaluate whether RTX-321 is tolerated, how much RTX-321 needs to be given, how often it should be given and if RTX-321 has anti-tumor activity against the cancer.

The trial is also assessing the pharmacodynamic effects of RTX-321 as measured by changes in number of CD8+ T-cells relative to baseline.

Visit their website to learn more.


Phase I & II Clinical Trial Resource

Mary Crowley Cancer Research is a specialized clinical research center that offers access to new investigational therapies through the administration of Phase I and II clinical trials. 

  • Personalized approach to cancer research
  • Clinical trials are matched to molecular information found within each cancer patient
  • Qualified Physician Investigators add to the understanding of what drives cancer and create innovative research applications that attack these drivers
  • Patient-centric focus brings the newest clinical trial options to patients at a rapid pace

Visit their website to view current Phase I and II clinical trial opportunities.


Join us for an upcoming event over clinical trials!

Don’t miss out on learning more about clinical trials and the patient experience! Join us for a collaborative event with SQZ Biotechnologies! You’ll hear the latest on cervical cancer and clinical trials from the first-hand experiences of an SQZ researcher as well as a patient focused panel. 

Register today!

Without Patient Stories, We Walk into a Firefight with a Calculator

Storytelling is powerful. Storytelling is compelling. In this age of social media, stories have evolved from words and pages to photos, memes and videos. Unfortunately, “anti-vaccination activists have weaponized stories and weaponized misinformation” and have used their stories to undermine the broader adoption of the HPV vaccine around the world.

Dr. Noel Brewer, chair of the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable, shares why patient stories are essential to combating the anti-vaccination movement.

“Antivaccine activists rely on story telling. We scientists come back with statistics and numbers. While our statistics and facts may be true, they have little power in this arena. We walk into this firefight with a calculator.”

“In the real world, statistics and data don’t hold power, except on pages of a medical journal. What matters is people and their lived experience. Having powerful stories cuts through to what matters.”

Cervivor stories can help fight against the anti-vaccination narrative.

The power of the story in the hands of Cervivor can be used to grow cervical cancer awareness and expand HPV vaccination.

“Vaccine hesitancy is one of the global threats of public health. Legislators and policymakers increasingly seem to think vaccination is waning. That isn’t true. It’s just that the few anti-vaccine people are so loud. They have an outsized voice that is dangerous to the public’s health and well-being.” Their voice can cause people to hesitate, rather than to move forward with HPV vaccinations for their daughters and sons.

In the U.S., HPV vaccination is in fact drifting upward – around 66% of teens have had at least a dose, if not the full course, Dr. Brewer reports. “This is a big accomplishment. But our goal at the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable is to reach 80% having all the recommended doses. This vaccine will save tens of thousands of lives. It’s remarkable that people say ‘no’ to a cancer vaccine. The antivaccine movement and the stories and falsehoods they share play a role in that.”

We have to make our stories as loud and compelling as the stories of the anti-vaccine activists.

Dr. Brewer’s Advice to Cervivors: Have an Elevator Speech

“One thing I would encourage survivors to do: have the elevator speech of your story. There will be many many opportunities to tell your one minute version. It is not so often you have 20 minutes, or even five minutes. But when you introduce yourself, when you meet someone, when the opportunity arises, have your one minute story. Have a few different one minute versions of the different parts of your story. Talking about your lived experience is powerful, and you can have huge impact even in a short time frame.”

In fact, Dr. Brewer many times shares some of the one minute Cervivor Story videos on the CervivorTV Youtube channel. He and his colleagues have shown Lisa Moore’s video hundreds of times, at meetings all around the world, to focus audiences on “what really matters” when they are discussing the HPV vaccine. Lisa lost her life to cervical cancer in 2017, but her story has lived on in a hugely impactful way. All of our stories can have this impact too.

Do you have your elevator speech?

What will you share?

Tap in to Cervivor’s videos, resources and trainings to shape your story, enhance your advocacy and use your voice to end cervical cancer.

A professor of Health Behavior at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public, Dr. Noel Brewer studies health behaviors. He examines ways to increase HPV vaccine uptake, and his research led to the development of “The Announcement Approach” to train providers to communicate more effectively about HPV vaccination and other vaccines for adolescents. Dr. Brewer chairs the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable, which brings a wide cross-section of stakeholders together to raise HPV vaccination rates and prevent HPV-related cancers.