CervivorTV Wins Again!

Cervivor Chief Visionary Tamika Felder and music composer Pete Lacey Receive Three Telly Awards

May 25, 2021 – During a year when the world shutdown, Cervivor created a video that shows what resilience and strength look like. The song, The Will to BE, written and composed by Cervivor caregiver Pete Lacey, is the backdrop to this timeless music video featuring amazing cervical cancer survivors from around the world. This beautiful video was made in partnership with Tim Hashko, President of Steaming Kettle.

Winning Gold in Three Categories: Social Impact, Social Not for Profit and The People’s Choice

CervivorTV now holds six Telly Awards

“Winning three Telly Awards for our work on Cervivor is a testament to the brave women in our network that advocate for themselves and others affected by the disease, who are forcing conversation about the ugly nature of this often misunderstood and stigmatized form of women’s cancer,” said Tamika Felder, Founder and Chief Visionary of Cervivor. “We feel heard – our stories are being validated and celebrated out of the 12,000 entries the Telly Awards receive, which shows that people want to learn about cervical cancer, they just need someone to teach them.”

“When I saw the first cut of the video, I knew it was going to be something special. I soon recognized that my aspirational lyrics that are lived by incredibly inspirational Cervivors, would be impactful, thought provoking and healing. I’m humbled to know the world now thinks so too”, said Pete Lacey.

“We wanted to show the world that cervical cancer is not faceless. We come from all walks of life and have been affected by this horrible disease but we continue to persevere and find joy in living”, said Carol Lacey, Lead Cervivor Ambassador and Production Manager for the The Will to BE video.

Cervivor knows the power a story holds and this community did not hesitate to step up and bring a light of hope when so much of the world is struggling. We saw these women just as they are, sharing that in spite all the adversity cancer brings, life is about the small moments that bring us laughter, happiness and a sense of calm. As the rest of the world moves through a challenging pandemic, those in the Cervivor community showed us that it is possible to rise above stronger together.

About Tamika Felder

Tamika Felder is well-versed in media on both sides of the camera: she’s provided commentary to national radio shows, worked as a journalist and producer in multiple capacities, and is now in the process of making her own documentary. See this short video on her lifestyle website to see how she’s living her second chance, and read more about her experience with cervical cancer on the Cervivor website

About Cervivor

Cervivor builds a community for cervical cancer survivors, family members, educators and caregivers to advocate for HPV awareness, cervical cancer prevention, to create meaningful networks across survivors and experts in the field; and to ultimately change the future of women’s health. To learn more, visit www.cervivor.org

About Pete Lacey

Pete is an inspirational artist who has earned his reputation as a talented musician, skillful performer and composer. Pete generously donates much of the proceeds of the sale of his music to cancer fighting organizations like Cervivor. To learn more, visit www.petelacey.com.

About The Telly Awards

The Telly Awards was founded in 1979 to honor excellence in local, regional and cable television commercials with non-broadcast video and television programming added soon after. With the recent evolution and rise of digital video (web series, VR, 360 and beyond), the Telly Awards today also reflects and celebrates this exciting new era of the moving image on and offline. The Telly Awards annually showcases the best work created within television and across video, for all screens. Receiving over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents, Telly Award winners represent work from some of the most respected advertising agencies, television stations, production companies and publishers from around the world. To learn more, visit www.tellyawards.com.

Losing Your Uterus, Losing Your Mind: Scientific Validation for Memory Loss After Cancer

When Samantha R. stumbled across a study suggesting that hysterectomies may cause memory problems, she clicked, read, and shared on our I’m A Cervivor Facebook group, kickstarting a dynamic discussion. Samantha shares her experience, her relief in finding the article, and the community of support that her post generated:

“Chemo brain gets a lot of discussion and attention, but not the topic of woman who had a hysterectomy or who have early onset menopause and who have similar fogginess. I actually did not have a hysterectomy but rather chemo-rad-brachy (stage 2b), which was oh so fun.  As radiation and chemo essentially killed my uterus and ovaries, this study about hysterectomies and memory loss caught my eye and resonated.

A wildlife ecologist, Samantha was diagnosed with cervical cancer at age 36 while in the midst of her postdoctoral research. The stress of the diagnosis and treatment on top of research and academics were brutal.

“After cancer, I couldn’t handle stress like I used to. I used to be able to do the cramming and the crunch time. But after treatment, I had really bad ‘chemo brain’ for at least a year until it finally started getting better. I still don’t feel as sharp as I was before, even though it’s been eight years since my diagnosis. As an academic with a master’s degree and a PhD, this had been really hard for me because my work, at the end of the day, depended on my brain. And of course brain fog doesn’t just impact work, but so many parts of life. My recall is slower. My short-term memory is slower. Things take me longer. It’s been hard for me to accept that my brain now functions differently. I used to be quick and make witty remarks. Now three days later, I come up with a response!”

Samantha was poking around online when she stumbled upon the article, New research suggests hysterectomies may cause memory problems.

“It’s about a first of its kind study conducted in rats (not humans), but the implications that our uterus plays a role in memory is just really interesting. I found it worth sharing because having an explanation gives women like us validation for having memory loss. It is nice to have some scientific acknowledgement of what we are going through.”

Newly published research has challenged a long-standing belief in the medical community that uteruses serve no purpose in the body except pregnancy. When researchers at Arizona State University performed hysterectomies on rats, the animals’ memory suffered.

Samantha’s Solutions: Coping Skills and Lessons Learned

Samantha now works for the federal government to protect and rebuild habitats for sea birds and sea ducks, specializing in restoration after oil spills. She shares some of the memory loss coping skills that she employs:

  1. Become a note taker: I take a lot of notes. I use a bullet journal. I now have a huge collection of hundreds of notebooks I’ve filled and it keeps growing, but it’s working for me.
  2. Keep a “done” list: Every day I write down not just to do lists, but “done” lists – so I remember that I did something. I capture calls I made, e-mails I sent, discussions and conversations I had.  My “done” list is my biggest coping strategy. My short term memory was really impacted from my chemo and the early menopause that resulted, so my journals and my “done” list are my recall mechanism. 
  3. Be proactive when it comes to therapy: My therapist has been amazing in coaching me to not beat myself up and to move forward and to be okay with not being okay. I had a hard time being weak – not just physically, but mentally weak. I’m a huge advocate of starting therapy early, when starting treatment, to get ahead of the roller coaster ride. I’d fallen into a severe depression after treatment was over, and I wish I’d started therapy earlier. 
  4. Don’t be afraid of medication: Medication has helped me battle my depression and panic attacks. My body doesn’t create estrogen and progesterone anymore. That makes a person crazy! It is not in your head! 
  5. Find your escape: I read a lot to escape. I’ve started meditating. I also started art therapy and do woodworking and jewelry making. I recently learned how to weld. I’ll never forget when I was in treatment and a social worker was trying to talk to me about art therapy and painting. I was like ‘screw you, I’m dying here.’ But now, years later, art has been my coping mechanism. It has become my sanity. (But I will never tell someone that during treatment! Only after!)

Eight year cancer survivor Samantha is a wildlife ecologist in San Diego, CA. When she is not protecting sea birds and restoring habitat for sea ducks injured by coastal oil spills, she volunteers with Burning Man and has attended the art festival 5 times. Learn more about Samantha’s Cervivor Story here.